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Hugh Jackman shows he has had his sixth skin cancer surgically removed

Written by White Angelis

HUGH Jackman has again called out to his seven million followers to wear sunscreen after posting his sixth treatment for skin cancer.

Jackman posted an image on his Instagram and Twitter accounts of a bandage over his nose.

“Another basal cell carcinoma. Thanks to frequent body checks and amazing doctors, all is well. Looks worse with the dressing on than off. I swear! #wearsunscreen” wrote the 48-year-old Sydney-born Jackman, who paid $56 million for a low-rise penthouse apartment in North Bondi in March last year.

Jackman, whose latest movie Logan, the third instalment in the X-Men’s Wolverine series, is released in Australian cinemas on March 2, has had at least six treatments for skin cancer.

Last year, he posted a photo to his Facebook page with a similar image of a bandage over his nose.

Hugh Jackman in February last year had similar treatment for basal cell carcinoma.

Hugh Jackman in February last year had similar treatment for basal cell carcinoma.Source:Instagram

His first treatment for basal cell carcinoma was in November 2013 when his wife Deborra-Lee Furness told him to get a mole on his nose looked at by a doctor.

Jackman tweeted: “Deb said to get the mark on my nose checked. Boy, was she right! I had a basil (sic) cell carcinoma. Please don’t be foolish like me. Get yourself checked. And USE sunscreen!!!

Hugh Jackman and his wife Deborrah-Lee Jackman in New York. Picture: Stuart Ramson

Hugh Jackman and his wife Deborrah-Lee Jackman in New York. Picture: Stuart RamsonSource:News Limited

There are three types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and melanoma. BCC appears as a lump or scaling area and is red, pale and pearly in colour. SCC is a thickened, red, scaly spot which may bleed easily or ulcerate.

Melanoma is the most dangerous form of skin cancer. Melanoma appears as a new spot, or an existing spot, freckle or mole that changes colour, size or shape. It usually has an irregular or smudgy outline and is more than one colour. Melanomas grow over weeks to months, and they can grow anywhere on the body.

Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma don’t tend to be as fatal as melanoma.

Approximately, two in three Australians will be diagnosed with skin cancer by the time they are 70, with more than 750,000 people treated for one or more non-melanoma skin cancers in Australia each year. Non-melanoma skin cancer is more common in men, with almost double the incidence compared to women.

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